It was a week ago that an Irish man was sentenced to five years in prison for raping a woman at her home in Cork.

He was only 21 years old and was in the grip of a depression after being dumped by a girlfriend who had been left homeless by the death of her husband.

In the end, he was convicted of a sexual offence but this did not stop him from having a second victim who was also 19.

A third victim was also raped by the man.

A fourth victim came forward in May this year to tell the story of how she was raped by a man who was in his late 20s, and was given a three-year sentence.

“It’s a big problem, there’s too many people in the community not talking about it,” she told the ABC.

The Irish Independent’s Paul O’Callaghan visited the jail in Cork on Friday to find out more about the rape crisis in the city.

He said that it was a case of “systemic injustice” where men are jailed for crimes they did not commit.

“This is a crisis in terms of the amount of men that are incarcerated for rape,” he said.

The Independent’s coverage on the crisis is available to download or stream on our website.

“There is a problem that they don’t have access, the Department does not have access and they don´tt like to keep quiet about it, the senior officer said. “

What I want to see is a system that is very clear, it is clear that this is a serious problem that needs to be addressed.” ‘They don´t even have access to information’ The Independent was told by the Department of Justice that a number of rape cases were not reported because they were not classified as sexual offences.

“There is a problem that they don’t have access, the Department does not have access and they don´tt like to keep quiet about it, the senior officer said.

Paul O´Callaghan is a senior investigator at the Irish Independent and is also the author of ‘The Last Girl: The Case of the Last Girl’ which examines the history of sexual abuse in Irish society.

“In my view there are a lot of men who are in the system who don’t get the information that they should be getting.” “

A lot of cases have been down,” he added.

“In my view there are a lot of men who are in the system who don’t get the information that they should be getting.”

Paul O′Callaghan said the situation is not just limited to Cork, but all across the country.

He added that Ireland needs to work with the Government to increase the number of sexual assault cases reported to police and prosecution.

“We need to see the Government really working to ensure that the victims are given the proper information and the right support,” he told the Irish news agency.

“And that we have a culture where men in the legal system are treated with respect and are protected from criminalisation.”

‘The system needs to change’ A spokesperson for the Department said the current system is broken.

In May this ‘Victim’ told the Herald how she had been sexually assaulted by a 21-year-old man she met online while she was on a date with another man. “

If we have any additional information that we may have to share, it will be shared with the Department for Public Safety and Correctional Services, as well as with the public and media,” they said.

In May this ‘Victim’ told the Herald how she had been sexually assaulted by a 21-year-old man she met online while she was on a date with another man.

“He came up to me and put his hand up my skirt, touching my pussy and my tits and he pulled down my shorts,” she said.

“I felt really, really uncomfortable, he put his fingers in my pussy, and he told me he wanted to have sex with me.”

The woman said she left the relationship soon after, and decided to come forward after being told about the situation on social media.

“At that time I didn’t know what it was and what he was, but I knew that this happened to someone,” she added.

She told the newspaper that she did not feel she was safe in Cork or elsewhere because of the stigma attached to rape and other sexual offences against women.

“No one is going to talk about it and that is why it happens in our society,” she explained.